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Proactive rounding: Perspectives and experiences of nurses and midwives working in a large metropolitan hospital

  • Gary Blackburn
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author.
    Affiliations
    Intensive Care Liaison Nurse Practitioner, Western Health Furlong Road, St Albans, VIC 3021 Australia
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  • Bodil Rasmussen
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: School of Nursing and Midwifery, Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research in the Institute for Health Transformation, Deakin University, 1 Gheringhap St, Geelong VIC 3220, Australia.
    Affiliations
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research in the Institute for Health Transformation, Deakin University, 1 Gheringhap St, Geelong, VIC 3220, Australia

    The Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research in the Institute of Health Transformation – Western Health Partnership, Western Health, Furlong Road, St Albans, VIC 3021 Australia

    Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 3B, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark

    Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark and Steno Diabetes Center, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M, Denmark
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  • Karen Wynter
    Affiliations
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research in the Institute for Health Transformation, Deakin University, 1 Gheringhap St, Geelong, VIC 3220, Australia

    The Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research in the Institute of Health Transformation – Western Health Partnership, Western Health, Furlong Road, St Albans, VIC 3021 Australia
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  • Sara Holton
    Affiliations
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research in the Institute for Health Transformation, Deakin University, 1 Gheringhap St, Geelong, VIC 3220, Australia

    The Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research in the Institute of Health Transformation – Western Health Partnership, Western Health, Furlong Road, St Albans, VIC 3021 Australia
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Published:December 09, 2021DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aucc.2021.09.006

      Abstract

      Background

      Rounding by the Rapid Response team (RRT) is an integral part of safety and quality care of the deteriorating patient. Rounding enables Intensive Care Units (ICU) liaison nurses to proactively identify deteriorating patients in the general wards and minimize the time spent by general nursing staff to call for assistance.

      Objective

      The study examined nurses’ and midwives’ experiences of proactive rounding by a RRT/ICU Liaison service, including the impact on workflow and patient care as well as enablers and barriers to utilization of the service.

      Method

      A mixed method approach was used: an online survey and semi-structured interviews with nurses and midwives in an acute care setting.

      Results

      52 respondents completed the online survey and 6 participated in a semi-structured interviews. The majority of survey respondents found the service useful and indicated that rounding by the ICU Liaison service improves patient care. Participants also believed that pro-active rounding increases staff confidence and builds rapport when utilizing the ICU Liaison service. Barriers to use of the service included the lack of out of normal business hours support and obtaining prompt support.

      Conclusion

      Proactive rounding was perceived by nurses and midwives to be beneficial for both themselves and patients, and ensured that deteriorating patients were identified.

      Keywords

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